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Posts Tagged ‘Med Wed’

MedWedPortrait

Hey Anti-Brides, I have to fess up, this bride Dr. Savant mentions below, is me, and although it’s been a few years since I’ve been on our honeymoon, the advice still stands. I have never been to Popoyo, Nicaragua to surf in May when the waves are jacked up and barreled – rather, January and March when the waves are easy rollers. Although my hubs was surfing like Slater all day in spots like Playgrounds, Panga Drops, Popoyo, and Colorado, (and a secret spot that I promised a certain young surfer named Auggie I will never reveal), there were only a few places where this long board girl could go. Popoyo is a pro surf mecca, hosting the likes of C.J. Hobgood, Slater, and our friends Justin Cote of TransWorld SURF and Strider Wasilewski of Quiksilver.

That said, it bears mentioning that any time a couple with mismatched surfing skills honeymoons or travels together, thought should be given to safety and potential injury. If there is a reef involved (and the requisite wipe out), you risk cuts, bruises and possibly broken bones. In my case, it was very windy, and schlepping a long board to the spots was like wrestling an alligator, which caused a lot of back and forth movement across the rib cage (and then up to 3 hours of paddling once in the water). Luckily for me, after my dear virtual Doctor Savant nailed the condition over email, it was no surfing for me for 3 days (Advil and Flor de Cana helped), poolside at the fabulous hill top Two Brothers Surf Resort. So before you think you are having a heart attack (the waves can do that to you anyway) – let Dr. Savant help you gauge what to really be scared about and when to just take it easy.

Also, note to self: if you are in a very remote jungle hut and you do have something life threatening, make sure you have a local phone ($20 at the airport) and travel insurance. Medivac helicopters can wipe out your bank account if you aren’t covered – $50-70 worth of travel insurance can go a long way. Read on!

I got an email from a friend who was on vacation about some chest pain she was having and I thought there were some interesting points about her situation and chest pain in general that could be helpful to think about.  Now, our bride and groom are fit but work too hard, like most successful people tend to do. They like to swim and surf so they took a long overdue vacation to a remote beach in Nicaragua for two weeks of surfing. The weather was great but a little windy and on some days the waves were pretty choppy. After a few days our bride started having pain in her chest that got progressively worse, so she stopped surfing.  It hurt when she was paddling her board out and then ached all night, especially when she took deep breaths or pressed on her sternum. Of course, having chest pain freaked her out and being in such a remote place made her even more anxious about it.  As it turned out her chest pain came from inflammation in the joint where the rib attaches to the sternum (breastbone) and was likely caused by strain and excessive use. Paddling in rough water, holding up her board on a windy beach, and even surfing more than usual are what caused the inflammation. The treatment for it is ice and using an anti-inflammatory medication like aspirin or ibuprofen.

So the question is what kind of chest pain should you be worried about? For the most part, everybody thinks about their heart when they have chest pain but there are lots of causes so here’s a quick way to think about it.  The chest pain caused by a heart attack is more commonly not even a pain at all but rather more like a crushing chest pressure. It’s as if an elephant were sitting on your chest and you just couldn’t get a breath in. Heart attack type chest pressure will not last for more than 30-60 minutes.  It will either get better suddenly or get much worse but won’t last all night.  Sometimes it can come on with exertion and stop with rest. Many times chest pain; especially in young, healthy, active people; is caused by an injury to the chest wall. Remember, your heart is protected in a cage that is layered with bone, muscle, cartilage, and other soft tissue so if you can reproduce the pain by pressing on your chest it’s not your heart.  Of course, it’s always important to know your health history, which includes your family’s history of heart disease, especially if it happened in someone at a young age.  The best way to do this is to check in with your doctor every year or two for a physical.  This way you can feel confident when you engage in strenuous activities, and that includes sex (a vacation must).

About

Dr. Savant heads up the Savant Medical Group in San Francisco. Dr. Savant attended the Medical College of Wisconsin and completed his Internal Medicine residency at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California in 1997 where he was given the “Grace Under Fire” Award by the Emergency Department. He then went to New York City to be on the Faculty of the Division of General Internal Medicine at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital where he also served as a clinical instructor to the third year medical students at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was identified by the medical students as an excellent clinical teacher and role model for the 1998-99 academic year.

 

MedWedPortrait

Hi, I’m Dr. Mark Savant, and I’ll be heading up the new Med-Wed section for Antibride.com. A destination wedding can bring a whole new sense of adventure and even intimacy to an already exciting day. It can also pose some health related challenges that you might not have to deal with otherwise. With just a little planning ahead and some common sense you should be able to enjoy your wedding day illness-free.

The types of health concerns you face are usually determined by where you go and can be divided, in general, by whether it will be hot or cold. The one thing that doesn’t matter is if you’re taking a plane. An airplane is a great place to catch a cold so don’t forget to wash your hands and don’t touch your face. If you can avoid touching your face alone you should be able to prevent most illnesses. Using a hand sanitizer regularly, especially before eating, is also helpful.

Hot climates usually mean lots of sun exposure so you’ll want to protect yourself. Wear loose-fitting clothing and a wide-brimmed hat. Use a good sunscreen, spf 30 minimum, liberally and don’t forget to reapply every few hours and especially after going into the water. Also don’t forget to apply the sunscreen to those hard to reach and less obvious places like the back of your neck, arms and legs and the tops of your ears.

Hydration is another important health concern. You’ll need to drink at least 2 to 3 liters of clear liquids, mostly water, per day and more if you drink alcohol or exercise. For alcohol I usually recommend to my patients to drink at least 2 glasses of water for each alcoholic drink consumed. Also, don’t skip meals. Regular, healthy eating will keep your energy levels at their optimum.

Hot climates can sometimes mean more exotic locales that may require a visit to your doctor or local travel clinic before you go. Depending on your destination you may need to get immunizations (is your tetanus shot up to date? good for 10 years) and antibiotics to have on hand. A great place to start is the Center for Disease Control. You can find your destination and get a good idea of what vaccinations you’ll need to get before you go.

Those exotic tropical locations can also have an increased risk for contracting a food borne illness. Here are a few things to remember so you don’t get sick. Don’t drink any water unless you know it’s been bottled. That also means no ice in your drink. Don’t eat any salads, which could have been washed in the water, and only eat fruit that you can peel. Eat no fresh sauces, like the hot sauce sambal in Indonesia, and no street food.

Cold weather destinations will have fewer health concerns, typically but there are still a few things to which you should pay attention. Cold wind and sunshine reflected off of snow can be very hard on the skin so use a good sunscreen and lip balm and use a good moisturizer on your skin once or twice a day. Wear warm clothing with particular attention to layering: silk or wool undergarments and then layers of fleece or wool and a good jacket, hat, scarf, or gloves depending on how cold it’s going to be. And again, hydration is just as important in cold weather as it is in warm.
And, finally here are a few general reminders. If you take prescription medications (ie birth control pills) don’t forget to bring them along.

Always wear a seat belt and look both ways before you cross the street, especially in right hand drive countries. As the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Relax, have fun, and be well.

About

Dr. Savant heads up the Savant Medical Group in San Francisco. Dr. Savant attended the Medical College of Wisconsin and completed his Internal Medicine residency at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California in 1997 where he was given the “Grace Under Fire” Award by the Emergency Department. He then went to New York City to be on the Faculty of the Division of General Internal Medicine at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital where he also served as a clinical instructor to the third year medical students at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was identified by the medical students as an excellent clinical teacher and role model for the 1998-99 academic year.

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